Overview:
Even during this Pandemic, there are more students experiencing high levels of stress than clinical levels of trauma. As such, schools and staff need to be stress-sensitive and stress-responsive to their students. This means that educators need to understand how the interaction between students’ physiological and psychological processes translates into classroom and school behavior and interactions.

This four-day/two-hours per day course will differentiate between anxiety, stress, and trauma, and discuss how students’ emotional “triggers” result in fight, flight, or freeze responses. We will talk about ways to teach students emotional self-regulation in the classroom so that students learn how to prevent and prepare for stressful situations. And, we will address how to analyze why some students still have difficulties, and what cognitive-behavioral interventions our mental health professionals may need to consider. All of this will be adapted to at-school, hybrid, and on-line/virtual school attendance models, as well as for general and special education classrooms.

This course is for administrators, general and special education teachers, related service professionals (counselors, educational/school psychologists, social workers), and other interested educators or clinicians.
Learning Objectives
During this course, participants will learn about and discuss:
  1. The characteristics of stress, anxiety, and trauma, and how the interaction between students’ physiological and psychological processes translates into classroom and school behavior and interactions.
  2. How to design and implement a psychologically-based, multi-tiered, stress-sensitive and stress-responsive system to address students’ emotional needs in schools and classrooms (as relevant to at-school, hybrid, and on-line/virtual school attendance models, as well as in classrooms with mainstreamed students with disabilities).
  3. Preventative approaches to teach students how to prevent and prepare for emotionally stressful triggers and conditions through emotional self-regulation skills and strategies.
  4. Ways to analyze and understand why some students continue to have frequent or significant stress-based classroom and school difficulties.
  5. Strategic cognitive-behavioral intervention approaches for students with significant stress-based classroom and school difficulties.
Training Schedule/Course Overview
Class 1 Introductions/Course Overview
The characteristics of stress, anxiety, and trauma, and how the interaction between students’ physiological and psychological processes translates into classroom and school behavior and interactions.
Class 2
How to design and implement a psychologically-based, multi-tiered, stress-sensitive and stress-responsive system to address students’ emotional needs in schools and classrooms (as relevant to at-school, hybrid, and on-line/virtual school attendance models, as well as in classrooms with mainstreamed students with disabilities).
Class 3
Teaching students emotional self-regulation skills and how to apply these emotional control and coping skills to different classroom and school situations. Teaching students how to prevent and prepare for different emotional triggers, physiological responses, inappropriate thoughts, and other “conditions of emotionality.
Class 4
How to analyze and understand why some students continue to have frequent or significant stress-based classroom and school difficulties. What strategic cognitive-behavioral intervention approaches are availablefor students with significant stress-based classroom and school difficulties, and how to collaborate with colleagues at the classroom, grade, and school levels to facilitate their implementation.
Howie Knoff
Howie Knoff, Ph.D. is an international consultant who, for over 35 years, has helped departments of education, provinces/districts, and schools succeed in the areas of school improvement and strategic planning, school discipline and classroom management, and multi-tiered systems of support—including strategic and intensive interventions for socially, emotionally, and behaviorally challenging students.

Dr. Knoff received his Ph.D. degree from Syracuse University in 1980, and has worked as a practitioner, consultant, licensed private psychologist, and university professor since 1978. He has published over 100 articles and book chapters, delivered over 5000 papers and workshops nationally, and authored or co-authored 24 books-including the (a) Stop & Think Social Skills Program; (b) Response to Instruction and Intervention: Implementing Successful Academic and Behavioral Intervention Systems; and (c) School Discipline, Classroom Management, and Student Self-Management: A Positive Behavioral Support Implementation Guide (Corwin Press, 2012).

A recipient of the Lightner Witmer Award from the American Psychological Association's School Psychology Division for early career contributions in 1990, and over $45 million in external grants during his career, Dr. Knoff is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association (School Psychology Division), a Nationally Certified School Psychologist, and a Licensed Psychologist in Arkansas. Dr. Knoff also was the 21st President of the National Association of School Psychologists which now represents more than 25,000 school psychologists nationwide.
 
DATES & TIMES:

5th, 12th, 19th & 26th January 2021
Each Session is for 2 Hours
EST 7:00 am | London 12:00 pm | Zurich 1:00 pm | Dubai 4:00 pm | India 5:30 pm | Hong Kong 8:00 pm
INVESTMENT
 
USD 400 Per Participant
USD 350 Per Participant for a Group of 5
USD 300 Per Participant for a Group of 10 or more
INCLUDES: Certificate of participation for 10 Professional Development hours
Upcoming Workshops
Teaching Social-Emotional and Self-Management Skills to Students with Disabilities: Inclass and Online
- By Howie Knoff
12th, 19th, 26th January & 2nd February 2021
Emails:
www.chaptersinternational.com
+91-9818362535