Overview:
Even the best-designed assessment system needs to be implemented thoughtfully, which requires that all users of assessment evidence have a certain degree of assessment literacy - an understanding of both the meanings and the consequences of educational assessments. Participants will learn what makes some assessments better than others, why student progress measures are almost entirely useless, why most tests will never produce useful diagnostic information on students, and why most school assessment systems do not do the things they are intended to do. The sessions will include a consideration of how assessments are interpreted, recorded, and reported to key stakeholders, as well as some in-class suggestions for how to get good and quick feedback from students. The four sessions are described below.
Session 1 - Quality in Assessment
While it is common to talk about assessments needing to be both reliable and valid, thinking about assessments in this way can often lead to confusion, since reliability can be thought of as both a pre-requisite for validity and at the same time, in tension with it (in the sense that attempts to improve validity can reduce reliability). Participants will learn about how to see validity as a property of inferences, rather than of assessments, and understand how changing assessments to improve the way they support some inferences may make them less able to support other, desired, inferences. In other words, any assessment system involves trade-offs.
Session 2 - Assessment literacy
An understanding of both the meanings and the consequences of educational assessments is an essential component of teacher expertise but there is little agreement about the term’s meaning. In this session, participants will learn about what makes some assessments better than others, why student progress measures are almost entirely useless, why most tests will never produce useful diagnostic information on students, and why most school assessment systems do not do the things they are intended to do.
Session 3 - Assessment design
This session covers the key stages of developing an assessment system:
  • Selecting a small number of big ideas for each subject
  • Creating learning progressions for each of the big ideas
  • Identifying key check points in the learning progressions
  • Developing assessments for each of the checkpoints
Session 4 - Evidence-Centered Design
Since assessments are, in essence, procedures for drawing inferences, it makes sense to design assessment by starting with the inferences they are intended to support. In other words, assessment design should be evidence centered. In this session, participants will learn about the four main processes in the evidence-centered design paradigm (task selection, task presentation, evidence identification, evidence accumulation) and understand how these ideas can be applied to a wide range of assessment design issues, including recording and reporting student achievement.
Potential Audience:
All K-12 Educators.
DYLAN WILIAM
Dylan Wiliam is one of the world's leading authorities on the ways that assessment can be used to improve student learning and has authored or co-authored over 300 articles, books, and book chapters on education. After 7 years teaching English, mathematics and science in urban secondary schools in London, he joined Chelsea College, University of London, which later merged with King's College London. During his time at King's College London, he ran the mathematics teacher education programme, co-ordinated a large scale testing programme, served for five years as Dean of the School of Education and from 2001 to 2003, was Assistant Principal of the College. In 2003 he moved to the United States, to take up the post of Senior Research Director at the Educational Testing Service in Princeton, New Jersey, and in 2006 returned to the UK as Deputy Director of the Institute of Education, University of London. Since 2010 he has worked as an independent consultant, advising schools, districts, and regional and national governments on how education can be improved, but he retains his link with the University of London as Emeritus Professor of Educational Assessment.
 
DATES & TIMINGS:

9th, 16th, 23rd & 30th January 2021
New York 7:00 am | London 12:00 pm | Zurich 1:00 pm | Dubai 4:00 pm | India 5:30 pm | Hong Kong 8:00 pm | Melbourne 11:00 pm
INVESTMENT
 
USD 400 Per Participants
If Participants register for Assessment Literacy and Formative Assessment they will get a discounted rate of USD 600 for BOTH the workshops
 
Formative Assessment Online Course - Five 90 Minute Online Sessions
- By Dylan Wiliam
6th, 13th, 20th, 27th February & 6th March 2021
 
Emails:
www.chaptersinternational.com
+91-9818362535